50 years ago, there was no Environmental Protection Agency, Clean Air Act, or Clean Water Act. Yet, for years people from Rachel Carson to the Save The Bay Founders had been sounding the alarm on the health of and threats to our environment, and in turn threats to human health. Earth Day started as a day of action to find solutions to environmental challenges, and as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, our greatest challenge, climate change, demands mass action. While we can’t physically be together to take action this Earth Day, Save The Bay is here with …


Save The Bay is committed to helping our community cultivate their connection to the Bay during shelter-in-place. Our Education Team is adapting lessons from the field to support teachers doing remote learning and parents looking for educational activities for their children. In the coming weeks we will be launching an Education Portal where all of our lessons will live. For now we are excited to share our Backyard Botanist activity to help you learn more about the flora that lives in your neighborhood this weekend. We encourage you to go out and find a plant or flower on your neighborhood walk …


 Save The Bay may have canceled our programs, but our teams are hard at work – advancing our capabilities and preparing for the day we can get back to the shorelines. We want to take you behind-the-scenes today with Jessie Olson, Associate Director of Native Plant Nurseries, who is sheltered at home, cleaning seeds for our large projects at Ravenswood and Bel Marin Keys. Watch and learn more about the steps required to take our seeds from harvest to planting. Enjoy and stay safe! Save The Bay’s mission remains vital and our Bay-Saving team is committed to moving that …


Today and every day, the legacy of our Founders reminds us to honor all women and those who identify as a woman. Save The Bay was founded by three Courageous Women. In 1960, Sylvia McLaughlin, Kay Kerr and Esther Gulick met over tea to discuss their concerns about an Army Corps of Engineers’ map that had been printed in the Oakland Tribune. It showed that San Francisco Bay could end up being a narrow shipping channel by the year 2020 because of planned Bay fill. It’s 2020, and today, “the Bay’s shoreline is approximately half the length of the California …


In a major milestone in the fight for clean parks and water in Oakland, Measure Q is on the March ballot.  For years, Oakland residents have had to deal with a lack of investment in the City’s parks which has led to inadequate landscaping, facility maintenance, and litter cleanup.  In fact, parks all over the city have creeks running through them, and all of Oakland’s parks are connected to storm drains that carry trash and other pollution into local creeks and the Bay. This water pollution not only trashes our parks and prevents residents from enjoying the creeks, but also …


Last February, we celebrated a significant victory in the battle against trash pollution when the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) took a rare enforcement action by issuing a Cease and Desist Order against another state agency – Caltrans – requiring it to speed up efforts to remove trash from highways and state-owned roads and stop polluting local creeks and the Bay. Trash that builds up along roadways doesn’t stay there. When it rains, runoff carries the trash into the storm drains, through the storm sewers and ultimately into our waterways. In every city in our region …


Save The Bay was hosted by Communities for a Better Environment (CBE) who led a tour of the city of Richmond about the deep and fruitful history of the city and its environment. Founded in 1978, CBE is regarded as one of the distinguished environmental justice organizations in the US. CBE states its mission is to, “build people’s power in California’s communities of color and low-income communities to achieve environmental health and justice by preventing and reducing pollution and building green, healthy and sustainable communities and environments.” Andrés Soto, the Richmond Community Organizer for CBE, led the tour and gave …


We are inspired and humbled by the incredible response and engagement of individuals, families, corporate partners, and communities that joined our 4th annual Bay Day. Bay Day 2019 was a resounding success and we are excited to extend our reach even further because the only way we can successfully protect and restore the San Francisco Bay habitat for humans and wildlife is by working together.


If you’ve been watching the news, you’ve probably heard some mention of King Tides in places like Sausalito, Mill Valley, San Francisco, and Alameda. A King Tide is a natural phenomenon that occurs near the Summer and Winter solstices, during the new and full moon phases, when the moon, sun, and Earth are aligned. This alignment causes the strongest biannual gravitational force on Earth’s oceans, resulting in these dramatic tidal fluctuations. King Tides help us to see today what will be the average daily high tides in 2050 due to climate change and show us now where flooding will occur …